St. Vincent Shares New Single “Down”

At this point it’s no stretch to say Annie Clark A.K.A. St. Vincent is music’s greatest shapeshifter right now. Five albums in and this imaginative visionary continues to reinvent herself with each album both musically and aesthetically, very much in the same vein as legends David Bowie and Prince. Clark is set to release her sixth St. Vincent album Daddy’s Home this Friday via “Loma Vista Recordings,” and today she has released a new track off the album titled “Down,” and much like her single “Pay Your Way in Pain,” this track features 70s-inspired grooves drawing from Young Americans-era Bowie and synth-driven Funk. You can watch the music video for “Down” below:

Track Review: Flying Rabbit – In the Middle


Artist: Flying Rabbit

Song: In the Middle

Genre: Alternative/Jazz/Psychedelic Rock

Label: Self-released

 There’s no denying the fact that Oslo, Norway-based band “Flying Rabbit” stand on their own musically, lyrically, and aesthetically as they plunge themselves into a musical realm they’ve created on their own, not succumbing to any contemporary musical trends. Seriously, what other bands out there right now can you say “Flying Rabbit” sound like? I bet you can’t name any, and on top of that how do you categorize their music? Is their a name for Psychedelic-tinged Swing music with theatrical vocals that soar high and topical content that has no interest in sugar-coating the issues brought on by the current state of our species? It’s refreshing hearing a band this unique in this day and age of recycled ideas. The band have dropped another refreshing new track titled “In the Middle.” Unsurprisingly, much thought is provoked after hearing the line “Stand in the middle with me” from said track. What is the middle? Does it represent centrism in politics? Is this a cry from a class that appears to be fading due to the cost of living rising while most citizens can’t rely solely on the low wages they receive to live comfortably? Or does this represent unique personal identity, art, and ideas that separate themselves from the zeitgeist of the modern world? These are all loaded questions that arise when hearing “In the Middle,” and yet, the band have no interest in bombarding us with lectures or sloganeering. Instead, they offer skillfully upbeat instrumentation with a slightly sinister melody filled with the band’s signature Jazz soaked rhythm section combined with guitars that range from groovy to Southern Gothic to back the lyrical themes of corporate greed and the evils of cutthroat competition. This is music to dance to while the world falls apart, and in the midst of it all lead vocalist Emily C. Brannigan urges us to stand in the middle with her where our mind, body, and soul are intact, devoid of greedy corruption. It’s hard to make a song like this and not fall into cheap anthem territory, but “Flying Rabbit” do it so seamlessly, which makes their music that much more genuine.

Written By: Steven Sandoval

Flying Rabbit Share New Music Video for “Don’t Oppress Me”

Dancing Soviet soldiers in space. Need I say more? “Flying Rabbit” have released a new music video for their track “Don’t Oppress Me,” which appears on their new E.P. Eclectic Playground, and being one of the EP’s most standout tracks, it’s only fitting that the video reflects its zany nature. The video consists of captions for you to sing along to, repurposed footage of dancing Soviet soldiers from God knows where, and spacey visuals that are quite hypnotizing. This is more proof that “Flying Rabbit” are an incredibly unique band that demands your attention. You can watch the music video for “Don’t Oppress Me” below:

Film Review: Geneva Jacuzzi’s Casket

Film: Geneva Jacuzzi’s Casket

Directed By: Chris Friend

Starring: Geneva Jacuzzi

Geneva Jacuzzi’s Casket is a short film that has been described as a “futuristic head trip” by the director of the film, Chris Friend, and no other description rings more true. Within a little over six minutes the viewer is delightfully bombarded with impeccable visuals that evoke the feeling one would get when reading a Philip K. Dick novel. Geneva Jacuzzi’s song “Casket” itself sounds like the kind of music replicants from the film Blade Runner would listen to. It’s robotic but filled with personality as if it were an android that has become self-aware. Chris Friend understands this music, so he perfectly mirrors the song’s tone with dystopian imagery, but instead of relying solely on trippy imagery, this film has a plot featuring characters with magnificent costumes and makeup, all played by Geneva Jacuzzi herself. The plot is intriguing, but frustrating, frustrating because it’s hard to follow due to the constant visuals being thrown at you, but that frustration is part of the film’s charm. Upon watching it my frustration got me thinking about the idea of “control.” Control is something we all like to think we have at any given moment. Much like the visuals in the film that derail your goal to follow the plot all the way through, life is filled with distractions and left turns that render us vulnerable as we try to work around the obstructions to reach our goals, and who knows how many secret forces are already controlling us right now. How does this relate to the film? Well, what is the sole purpose of robots? To control them. To have them do things for you to make your life stress free and convenient, but what happens when your Pleasure-U BioDrone contracts a mental disease and you’re forced to amputate its head? Well, our main character in the film who goes by the name Kate Shaw faces this dilemma, making the decision to keep the body of the drone alive in what is called a “Pleasure Center Casket” as an attempt to regain control of the situation, but sure enough that control diminishes as the BioDrone’s head continuously calls to Kate’s brain with hallucinatory visions. This could symbolize all of things that are used to brain wash us from various forms of media, constantly telling us how to think and how to feel. If that isn’t control, then I don’t know what is. Maybe that’s not even close to what director Chris Friend was getting at with this film, but this film is the work of a director who clearly has no interest in spelling things out for the viewer, so in the end you’re forced to formulate your own interpretation, and even if your interpretation is wrong, that’s okay, because you have no control over that either. 

Written By: Steven Sandoval

Vanarin Share New Single “Care”

Italian band “Vanarin” have returned with a new single titled “Care.” Set to appear on their upcoming full-length album Treading Water, “Care” is the most adventurous the band have sounded musically with a synth-driven outro that brings to mind 80’s Sci-Fi/Horror á la John Carpenter. The track is lusciously dreamy, and the lyrical content reflects the moody yet groovy tone of the music speaking on those moments where we get lost in our own thoughts, and i’m sure most will agree with me that we’ve had plenty of self-reflection to deal with thanks to our current pandemic. You can watch the music video for “Care” below:

Tarah Who? Share New Single “Manners”

“Tarah Who?” have been on a roll this year so far. Not too long ago they released their superb rage-filled song about the unfair treatment most of us face in the workplace titled “Swallow That Pill,” and today the band have released their follow-up single “Manners.” This track is less aggressive in nature, but no less impactful than “Swallow That Pill.” The song is inspired by lead singer Tarah Carpenter’s mother who was abandoned as a child and raised by nuns who were really strict. “She always puts herself last and tries to understand everyone, which is a real strength. It occurred to me one day that she was taught to be a good citizen, with good manners, but no one really cared for her as a parent would,” explains Carpenter. You can watch the music video for “Manners” below:

The Reality TV Shares New Single “Beats”

Musician Benjamin Mace-Crossley has released his new single “Beats” under his “The Reality TV” project, and it’s appropriately titled because this track has a danceable drum machine beat that will get you moving immediately. Topped with goth-tinged guitars and synthesizers that evoke the spirit of 80’s “Dark Wave” or “EBM,” this song is a gloomier and doomier dance tune that brings poppy fun to the aforementioned genres without straying into despair. You can listen to “Beats” below:

Panic State Share New Single “Viral Love”

Valentine’s Day was almost a week ago, but London based trio “Panic State” aren’t done sharing the love, viral love that is. Today the band dropped their new single “Viral Love” and it’s the band’s most fun track yet filled with energetic instrumentation and an earworm of a chorus that will have you shouting the lyrics. You can listen to “Viral Love” below:

Iceage Announce New Album “Seek Shelter,” Share New Single “Vendetta”

Not too long after the release of their recent single “The Holding Hand,” and the announcement of their signing to “Mexican Summer,” “Iceage” have unveiled details of their new album Seek Shelter. The album will be released on May 7th via “Mexican Summer,” and the band have also released a new single off the album titled “Vendetta.” You can watch the music video for “Vendetta” below:

Iceage Share New Single “The Holding Hand”

After signing to label “Mexican Summer,” “Iceage” have returned with a new single titled “The Holding Hand,” and it’s looking like there are big things from the band coming our way. New album perhaps? Fingers crossed. About “The Holding Hand,” the band have stated “the song lives in a slurred world, movements are elastically stretched out and strength is found in weakness while you find it hard to tell the difference between fume and matter. Gently the swaying intensifies, feel it escalate. Reach out for the holding hand, it seems almost within scope now.” You can watch the music video for “The Holding Hand” below: