Album Review: Cherry Glazerr – Stuffed & Ready

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Artist: Cherry Glazerr

Album: Stuffed & Ready

Genre: Indie Rock/Alternative Rock/Indie Pop

Rating: 7/10

Clementine Creevy is pretty much the sole member of “Cherry Glazerr,” a band that formed in Los Angeles, California back in 2013, and the rotating lineup has allowed the band to reinvent themselves with each listen. Starting off as a lo-fi “Indie Rock” project, and then moving into a “Garage Rock” direction filled with youthful fervor, “Cherry Glazerr” has always emphasized instrumentation, knowing the importance of musicianship, and that strong focus on instrumentation has never been more apparent than on the band’s fourth album Stuffed & Ready. The production is polished and the instrumentation is immaculate trading in the raucous delivery of their previous work for lush layers of jangly “Dream Pop” reminiscent guitars that go from gentle and dreamy to loud and distortingly ear-splitting very often throughout the album. Lead singer and guitarist Clementine Creevy’s subtle vocals may not always match the intensity of the instrumentation, but her introspective lyricism that often focuses inward is intriguing and admirable. The lyrical content delves into themes such as uneasiness, uncertainty, and these themes are at times delivered in a self-deprecative tone. “My isolation is simple and stupid as me,” sings Creevy on the unsparingly honest track “Isolation.” The theme of solitude is often explored, and it’s faced head-on on the track “Self Explained,” where Creevy details the unfair pressure she puts on her self to go out and Socialize simply because she’s afraid of being alone. “I don’t want people to know how much time I spend alone” sings Creevy, and that brutal honesty and the sound of embarrassment in her voice leads to a heartbreaking listen. The track “Daddi” features a desperate need for guidance, and the lyrics are quite discomforting at times, but these songs are never self-deprecating or brutally melancholy for shock value. You can hear it in her voice that she’s taking herself to therapy by realizing and tackling the negatives to overcome them in an attempt to find her own personal liberty, and though the lush instrumentation can distract you from the words that are being said, it’s definitely worth it to delve into the lyrics, because they completely add new context to the songs when reading them. Compared to other artists within the genre who may deliver this style better, this album can seem inessential, but there’s no denying that this album is emotionally effective, and that maturity is captivating.

Written By: Steven Sandoval 

Date:02/05/19

 

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