E.P. Review: Lucky Iris – Turns Out We Should Have Stayed At Home

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Artist: Lucky Iris

EP: Turns Out We Should Have Stayed At Home

Genre: Pop/Alternative Pop/Indie Pop

Label: Self-released

Rating: 8/10

Remember when we used to be able to go out? Seems like forever ago doesn’t it? Though it was fun to spend a night out on the town bar hopping, hanging out with friends, and meeting new people, there were also those nights where things didn’t go according to plan. Where we’d end up alone, surrounded by laughing people having fun while we stared at our phones to look busy and less alone. Where are the club anthems about those nights? Leeds duo “Lucky Iris” haven’t forgotten about those nights, and they’ve captured that feeling perfectly on their debut E.P. Turns Out We Should Have Stayed At Home. Formerly of the band “Everyday People,” “Lucky Iris” consists of vocalist Maeve and producer Jasper, and their chemistry is impeccable as the two create Pop music with an Alternative edge mixing a bit of Indietronica, R&B, and piano lead sentiment that is as heavy on self-realization as it is melancholy. Turns Out We Should Have Stayed At Home isn’t a preachy statement, but it is a deep look inward that frequently looks outward at the same time. It’s a concept E.P. about the nights of feeling the need to fill that void with validation from others, and with this dive into this reality these songs realize the superficiality that comes out of it all. “When I was younger I was told to be kind and look nice, but to be seen and not heard. Then they taught me to argue, how to think for myself, but now i’m too outspoken, they still call me little girl” sings Maeve on the opening track “Get Ready With Me,” a song that notices roles we feel like we must play when it comes to social situations, but instead of having a “humanity is doomed” tone, “Get Ready With Me” feels like it has two meanings. On the surface it sounds like our narrator is getting ready for a night out, but there can also be an underlying message of self-acceptance as she encourages us to get ready for a better human condition if we were to just acknowledge who we truly are instead of succumbing to social norms. At least that’s my interpretation. The following track “Take 5 (Why Can’t You See Me?)” is a beautiful piano-driven song about the feeling of isolation as you’re alone but surrounded by people who look right through you. It’s vulnerable and quite possibly the biggest tearjerker on the E.P. That’s what’s so fascinating and refreshing about this music, it’s honest, it’s not afraid to be vulnerable, and it’s a look at how social norms can truly damage someone’s self-esteem and mental state, but it isn’t all a grim look into those nights. “Glitter Vision” is the most danceable track which is fitting seeing as how the subject is about the point where you start to appreciate your own company and dance the night away by yourself, unafraid of the feelings of alienation, but like the frequent ups and downs of life, this track is immediately followed by a broken mindset on the closing track “Fell Backwards.” It’s a painful listen and I mean that in the kindest way possible. Since this is a concept album, which to me is like a film, I don’t want to spoil the ending, but it leaves the listener on a sad note as our narrator feels alone, broken, and unsure what to do following everything she’s done to appease others only to feel like she’s falling backwards. It’s a lot to take in. If you were to restart this E.P. over again you’d get that mood shift again, like a constant loop, much like the shifting moods of our lives. This is a fascinating listen because it doesn’t glorify the partying lifestyle. It by no means says going out is devoid of it’s fun and memorable times, but it is a reminder that things can be very shallow out there, and that we should treat each other better, including yourself. Here’s to when we can go out again.

Written By: Steven Sandoval

https://luckyirisband.hearnow.com/?fbclid=IwAR29bLo2Jdf-_TsuZug7gg4ND-FIRaUAXKjIjvRIy5mk4P9zvr6joPGu9lc

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