Album Review: Deli Girls – BOSS

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Artist: Deli Girls

Album: BOSS

Genre: Electronic/Industrial/Techno-Punk

Label: Deli Girls Inc.

Rating: 8/10

It feels like this is the ideal time for a new “Deli Girls” album, but then again, I don’t think there’s ever a time when a “Deli Girls” album isn’t appropriate. The anger and frustration that is a reaction to the homophobia, transphobia, sexism, racism, and other forms of hate that unfortunately plague this country is completely warranted and will continue until things become fair in this country, if that ever happens. The Brooklyn duo wear this anger on their sleeves and use it to fight hate with abrasiveness and aggression. This isn’t your Hot Topic “it’s not a phase mom” teen rebellion oh no, this is  revolutionary music in its purest form. Music that challenges you, confronts you, and antagonizes you, but with that being said, “Deli Girls'” new album BOSS is never overly political or bias. This music is a place where many of us who have felt misfitted or wrongfully judged can call home. The band could have gone in a direction that recycles their earlier work, becoming a predictable gimmick of themselves, but on BOSS it’s evident that the two have the musical vision and knowledge to match their unadulterated rage. Those who have said the band is one-dimensional will quickly eat their words when listening to this album, because along with the band’s simplistic yet impactful instrumentation that draws influence from Industrial, video game inspired synth-lines, and heavy distorted bass that will knock the framed pictures off your wall, the band explore new territory, incorporating even darker atmospherics and even featuring beautifully haunting harp and violin provided by duo “LEYA” on the track “Barriers to Love.” There’s even a cover of “Korn’s” song “Faget” which the band beautifully reinvents and turns into a new anthem. The band really outdid themselves with this one.

Written By: Steven Sandoval

https://deligirls.bandcamp.com/album/boss-2

Album Review: Machine Girl – U-Void Synthesizer

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Artist: Machine Girl

Album: U-Void Synthesizer

Genre: Electronic/Hardcore/Breakcore/Industrial/Drum and Bass

Label: Self-Released

Rating: 8/10

Listening to Machine Girl’s music is like being sucked into a tornado carrying the most abrasive elements of various genres, and I do mean ABRASIVE. What a long way Machine Girl has come from spewing out tons of “Electronic” instrumentals on “Bandcamp” to getting even louder and louder with every release while lead member Matthew Stephenson screams his guts out. Following the highly successful The Ugly Art, Machine Girl has returned with his follow-up U-Void Synthesizer, and somehow this album is even noisier than it’s predecessor. Like The Ugly Art, this album incorporates live drums that give this album a fuller sound that evokes the fast-paced and brutal spirit of “Punk,” but just keep in mind, this isn’t “Dead Kennedys.” This is Synth-Punk meets Industrial meets Breakcore meets just about every abrasive genre known to man. It’s uncompromising, it’s discombobulating, but that’s part of this album’s charm. Sure it’s not for everyone, okay, sure it’s not for most people, (anyone who hasn’t acquired this taste will think that all of their electronic household appliances got together to have an orgy) but this is futuristic “Punk,” the result of the massive influence “Death Grips” have had on a younger generation of DIY artists such as “Deli Girls” and “Five Star Hotel.” Machine Girl is undeniably the torch carrier for this generation, and though they can be lyrically absurd with lines like “I don’t want you on my dick so suck my shit,” that absurdity combined with loads of cryptic content is fun to decipher and formulate your own interpretation. U-Void Synthesizer isn’t much of a departure from The ugly Art, but it’s louder and noisier and Machine Girl’s sound hasn’t lost it’s appeal quite yet.

Written By: Steven Sandoval