Poppy Announces Expanded Album “I Disagree (more)”

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Today Poppy has announced the release of a new expanded edition of her recent album I Disagree titled I Disagree (more.) The album will drop August 14th via “Sumerian Records,” and will feature four bonus tracks “If It Bleeds,” “Bleep Bloop,” “Khaos x4,” and “Don’t Ask.” She has shared the track “Khaos x4,” and it continues the enticing combination of Metal and Pop that I Disagree offered. You can listen to “Khaos x4” below:

Deftones’ “Diamond Eyes” Turns 10

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On this day in 2010 “Deftones” released their sixth album Diamond Eyes. Following the completion of their album Eros, Deftones bassist Chi Cheng was seriously injured in a car accident that left him in a coma. The band decided to put the release of Eros on hold and started playing shows with bassist Sergio Vega. Unsure of when Chi Cheng would make a full recovery, the band decided to record a brand new album with Sergio Vega. The band felt that Eros didn’t represent where the band was at the time, and wanted to record something more optimistic as opposed to the darker album they had just recorded, and considering the circumstances with Cheng at the time, optimism is definitely what the band needed. This resulted in Diamond Eyes, an album that was instrumentally straight-forward with the band going back to their roots writing and recording together as a unit and avoiding the use of Pro Tools. Produced by Nick Raskulinecz, this album found the band sounding their most raw, hearkening back to the days of Adrenaline and Around the Fur, but at the same time improving on their stunning combination of The Cure-esque guitar melodies and visceral heaviness. Chi Cheng unfortunately passed away in 2013, but the band is still strong today carrying the spirit of Chi Cheng, who is still a member in my opinion despite his passing. Rest In Peace Chi, and Happy Anniversary Diamond Eyes.

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Album Review: Poppy – I Disagree

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Artist: Poppy

Album: I Disagree

Genre: Pop/Nu-Metal/Metalcore/Industrial Metal

Label: Sumerian Records

Rating: 9/10

 Whenever an artist announces that they’ll release a new album consisting of sounds from a genre they’re not primarily known for, it’s hard not to be skeptical or roll your eyes upon hearing the news. There’s always that chance that the outsider not versed in the genre will regurgitate stereotypes and package it as whatever genre they’re going for. So when word caught on that musician and internet sensation “Poppy” was going to release a heavier and darker album, it unsurprisingly divided the fans that loved her sugary “Alt Pop” and immediately prompted “Metal” elitists to throw a fit, but what seemed like something that would fall into parody turned out to be rather impressive. Fucking incredible to be honest. I’ve been aware of Poppy. Though I wouldn’t necessarily call myself a fan of her previous work, i’ve always respected the unusual and artistic take on her own brand of “Pop,” and even the strange David Lynch-esque nature of her internet videos. Her new album I Disagree wasn’t necessarily a priority for me and after how stacked this year has already been so far with new releases I honestly and ashamedly had forgotten about it, but after much buzz I finally listened to it, and I was pleasantly surprised. This is the most accomplished fusion of Metal, Pop, and Electronic Music i’ve heard in a very long time. This album works on so many levels. It’s undeniably heavy, drawing influences from “Metalcore” and “Nu-Metal,” it’s immensely polished with pristine yet filthy production that incorporates elements of “Dubstep” and “Industrial,” and Poppy’s “burn shit down” attitude combined with a sense of maturity, optimism, and animated yet lush vocals are a recipe for success. Another reason why this album works is that Poppy doesn’t sound like she’s trying to sound “Metal.” She’s not throwing up devil horns while wearing a pentagram t-shirt. Instead she’s just being Poppy, a darker Poppy yes, but this progression feels genuine. Though lyrically simplistic, Poppy’s intentions are clear. They’re to inspire. To inspire us to be true to ourselves, to question authority, to be free, and to innovate, and not once does it come off as corny. To all the Metalheads that will dismiss her as a “poser” or disingenuous, think of it this way, she never actually said she was making a “Metal” album, she’s just incorporating a darker sound while showcasing her love for all things “Metal,” and by default the album is undeniably “Metal” and drags the genre kicking and screaming out of it’s element. The fact that it takes someone who’s primarily known for “Pop” to do that says a lot about your refusal to evolve. Poppy is going to do Poppy, unafraid of backlash, and that’s utterly inspiring. 

Written By: Steven Sandoval

 

Code Orange Share New Song “Swallowing The Rabbit Whole”

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Code Orange are set to release their new album UNDERNEATH on March 13th via “Roadrunner Records,” and today the band gave us another taste of the upcoming album. Titled “Swallowing The Rabbit Whole,” the song is just as vicious and rage-filled as the title suggests, and is incredibly experimental with odd time signatures and of course features an incorporation of Electronic/Industrial. The music video is just as explosive and creative. You can watch the music video below:

 

Korn’s “Issues” Turns 20

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On this day in 1999 “Korn” released their fourth album Issues. At the height of the “Nu-Metal” craze of the late 90’s, the music world became saturated with copy after copy of bands jumping on the band wagon creating trendy music devoid of originality. Though 1999 was when “Nu-Metal” was at it’s peak with bands like “Limp Bizkit” climbing the charts, (kinda laughable now isn’t it?) the genre at the same time was on it’s way out, but the pioneers of “Nu-Metal,” as is the case of most pioneering bands, “Korn” weren’t interested in repeating the “Nu-Metal” tropes they helped create, instead they experimented even further with their album Issues, but this time stripped back their sound reducing it to a simplistic heaviness, a heaviness that was immensely polished and had a new strict sense of focus thanks to producer Brendan O’Brien who didn’t allow the band to party and fool around. Issues was heavy no doubt, but this album found lead singer Jonathan Davis delivering his best and most melodic vocal work. It’s almost as if this is Korn’s Pop album, well, whatever tortured, incredibly dark, and unsettling Pop world this album can belong to. Of course “Korn” are still active today with a large devoted following of passionate fans, but Issues marked the end of an era, and displayed the band’s refusal to succumb to trends. Happy Anniversary.