Track Review: The Earflower Experiment – Emerge (feat. Aman Saxena)

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Artist: The Earflower Experiment

Song: Emerge (feat. Aman Saxena)

Genre: Alternative Rock/Psychedelic Rock/Indie Rock

Label: Self-released

New Delhi artist Astaaq Ahmed has proven himself to be an imaginative visionary with his project “The Earflower Experiment.” His music tells a story while he instrumentally delves into a myriad of genres that maintains his Psychedelic Folk style but isn’t limited as he incorporates clever production techniques and sound design. His new track “Emerge” featuring producer Aman Saxena solidifies his talent. On this track he metaphorically sings from the perspective of someone escaping an ocean as he nearly drowns, and this symbolizes getting out of a toxic relationship. While he sings over melancholy acoustic guitar, we hear waves and splashes from this metaphorical ocean as the track builds into a feeling of being reborn as he is now free. The track then smoothly transitions into a guitar lead final act that can be compared to a band like “Pink Floyd” as the Psychedelia makes itself more prominent and closes the book of this beautifully sentimental story. This is Ahmed at his most vulnerable, and yet he embraces the negative aspects of this relationship embedded in toxicity to recognize his self-worth. This is thoughtful music at its best.

Written By: Steven Sandoval

 

 

 

E.P. Review: Movie Club – Man O’ War

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Artist: Movie Club

EP: Man O’ War

Genre: Instrumental/Garage Rock/Psychedelic Rock

Label: Self-released

Rating: 7/10

There’s nothing like witnessing a band perform. The chemistry between every member, the ideas that are bounced off each other as each member brings their own distinct quality to the table, it’s a beautiful thing to see and hear, but what’s even more impressive is when a band only has two members. Of course duos are nothing new, but when two people can create a sound that gives off the illusion that you’re listening to a quartet, it’s a massive accomplishment. Meet “Movie Club,” an instrumental duo hailing from Venice Beach, CA. Consisting of members Jessamyn Violet on drums and Vince Cuneo on guitar, their chemistry is infectious as their seamless interplay makes you wonder if they share the same brain. Their new E.P. Man O’ War is no exception. The duo flirt heavily with “Psychedelic Rock” on this record, which feels like a natural progression, and they’ve even incorporated bass thanks to musician Tim Lefebvre (David Bowie, Black Crowes). With this sound the band takes you on a journey with each song, a journey that feels cinematic, which is fitting considering the band’s name. As a matter of fact, the band’s appreciation for film is especially apparent in the music videos for the tracks “Moonbow” and “Bones” which features recurring mysterious white wolves who chase the duo in a Horror inspired style. The band never wastes a second on this E.P. as every track has enough change-ups to veer away from boring repetition, but at the same time they don’t bombard you with over-ambitious grandiosity as these are jams you can sit back and relax to without being surprised by an abrupt dramatic transition. These tracks flow smoothly, but at the same time they’re a spiritual journey if you want to ingest it that way. This E.P. can be a journey, it can be your new favorite music to chill out and smoke a doobie to, or it can be the soundtrack to your commute, walk, or exercise, whatever it may be to you, you can count on this E.P. to never be boring.

Written By: Steven Sandoval

Album Review: Tame Impala – The Slow Rush

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Artist: Tame Impala

Album: The Slow Rush

Genre: Psychedelic Pop/Electronic/Disco

Label: Island Records

Rating: 7/10

It seems as if “Tame Impala” have had acclaim from the start. Lead by sole member Kevin Parker who composes and arranges the majority of the music, “Tame Impala” has been an inescapable name in both the “Indie Rock” world and the “Pop” world, but what “Tame Impala” once was is not entirely the same as what “Tame Impala” is now, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. The Kevin Parker we knew back during the time of the Psychedelic-heavy Innerspeaker, and the vulnerable Kevin Parker we knew on the introspective Lonerism, an album that was a voice for the lonely and those whom suffer from society’s misguided view on introversion is now a new Kevin Parker, but he hasn’t abandoned introspection and vulnerability. In fact, the majority of the tracks on his new album The Slow Rush are incredibly introspective with lyrical themes heavy on existentialism and nostalgia, but at this point in time it sounds like Parker is instrumentally more concerned with making us dance, trading in the LSD-soaked Psychedelia and fuzzy guitars of his early work for lush synths and Electro-Pop melodies drawing from Funk, Disco, and Synth-Pop. Very much like what he was doing on his previous album Currents, and there lies the good and bad of The Slow Rush. Not much has changed on this album, which prompts one to believe that Parker is either playing it safe, or truly isn’t finished experimenting with this sound but isn’t reaching anything that is breaking new ground. Though both albums are cut from the same cloth, The Slow Rush isn’t without it’s gems. The opening track “One More Year” is a message to the fear of life becoming stagnant, “Breathe Deeper” is a lush and sexy banger with a refrain that will stick in your head for days, and “It Might Be Time” features a surprising contrast of joyful instrumentation and existentialist lyrics. However, a lot of these tracks sound like Currents throwaways and don’t quite deliver anything memorable or anything that keeps them from being disposable. That isn’t to say this album isn’t a smooth listen though, because when this album shines, it SHINES, and much of it is cohesive, but I feel like the next “Tame Impala” album needs to be vastly different, or Parker needs to hone this style and create an album with consistent replay value.

Written By: Steven Sandoval 

 

 

The Doors’ “Morrison Hotel” Turns 50

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Following their string-heavy and largely produced album The Soft Parade, “The Doors” got down to brass tacks with their follow-up Morrison Hotel. On this album the band went even further down the drunk and Bluesy road the band had been hinting at on prior releases, leading to a combination of the band’s signature “Psychedelic Rock” and whisky-soaked bar Rock that playfully sounded like the band having a good ol’ drunken time at your local dive bar on a Friday night. Though this album more often than not gets overshadowed by the more superior releases in the band’s catalog, this album spawned some essential tunes like “Roadhouse Blues” and “Waiting for the Sun,” and was a stepping stone toward the ultimate Blues the band had perfected on their following album L.A. Woman. Happy Anniversary.

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Tame Impala Share New Single “Lost In Yesterday”

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Tame Impala are set to release their long-awaited album The Slow Rush on February 14th. Today the band released another new track off the upcoming album titled “Lost In Yesterday,” and much like their previous singles the track is a groovy laid-back jam that doesn’t exactly break new ground, but is easy on the ears and is as moody as it is danceable. You can listen to “Lost In Yesterday” below:

Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” Turns 40

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On this day in 1979 “Pink Floyd” released their legendary Rock opera The Wall. Though this was the point where member Roger Waters took it upon himself to take complete control of the band, which slowly diminished the rest of the band’s creative input, (he even fired pivotal member Richard Wright) this album still came out to be one of music’s most iconic concept albums. This album is an extensive cinematic experience that tells the story of a burnt out Rock star named Pink who begins to isolate himself from society which leads to his descent into madness. The character of Pink was based on Roger Waters himself and former member Syd Barrett. The album can be a bit pretentious, but the narrative of Pink’s mental downfall is captivating. The instrumentation was a lot more stripped back, which made room for the album’s narrative, but the theatrical and climactic moments added to the intensity of the album. In my opinion this was the band’s final masterpiece, but it also was the point where the band slowly began to fall apart, regardless of the creative differences and egos that plagued the band, their discography is the stuff of innovative legends, and The Wall is one of the best concept albums ever recorded. Happy Anniversary.

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Album Review: The Comet Is Coming – Trust In The Lifeforce of the Deep Mystery

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Artist: The Comet is Coming

Album: Trust in the Lifeforce of the Deep Mystery 

Genre: Jazz/Nu-Jazz/Electronic/Psychedelic Rock

Label: Impulse! Records 

Rating: 7.5/10

Listening to London based trio “The Comet is Coming” is like having an LSD infused spiritual journey that is both meditative and exhausting. The attention to instrumental detail whether it be the spacey “Electronic” inspired keyboards, the crisp drums, or the sharp skittering saxophone which takes front and center, one thing is for sure, something in their music will resonate with you and pummel you with both tumult and melodic beauty. Self-described as “apocalyptic space funk,” the band fully introduced us to their world on their 2016 debut Channel the Spirits, now the band have returned with their follow-up Trust in the Lifeforce of the Deep Mystery. This album focuses even further on the themes of apocalypse and chaos completely through improvisational instrumentation. It’s darker in tone but no less melodic and immensely jam-filled. However, not much has changed from their previous work. This album is more of the same, but as of right now that’s okay, because the music still captivates and immerses you into their beautifully chaotic world, and to be able to do that with instrumentation alone and only one track that has spoken word vocals is no easy feat. Upon hearing them, it’s inevitable to yearn for a live experience of the band, and they have impressively captured what it must be like to see them live on record. This album is a reminder that “Jazz” infused improvisation is still alive and well, with the genre exploring new territories, and in the wake of this new-found interest in “Jazz,” this album couldn’t have arrived at a better time.

Written By: Steven Sandoval 

Date: 03/19/19